Translation

loremIpsum
English
Key English Polish
accServiceDesc ⛵ This service allows compatible applications to easily counteract small device movements within their user interface.

🏝️ This can improve screen readability and possibly alleviate motion sickness while on the go, e.g. while reading in a moving vehicle.

🛡️ The app needs your permission to know which window is visible on the screen. It does not read window contents.

ℹ️ Find more info, implementation details and examples on:

github.com/Sublimis/SteadyScreen
⛵ Ta usługa umożliwia kompatybilnym aplikacjom łatwe przeciwdziałanie ruchom małych urządzeń w interfejsie użytkownika.

🏝️ Może to poprawić czytelność ekranu i ewentualnie złagodzić chorobę lokomocyjną podczas podróży, np. podczas spaceru. podczas czytania w jadącym pojeździe.

🛡️ Aplikacja potrzebuje Twojej zgody, aby wiedzieć, które okno jest widoczne na ekranie. Nie czyta zawartości okna.

ℹ️ Więcej informacji, szczegółów realizacji i przykładów znajdziesz na:

github.com/Sublimis/SteadyScreen
appDesc ⛵ This service allows compatible applications to easily counteract small device movements within their user interface.

🏝️ This can improve screen readability and possibly alleviate motion sickness while on the go, e.g. while reading in a moving vehicle.

⚡ The application has been crafted very meticulously, in order to minimize resource usage and maximize performance.

Hope you enjoy it 😊
⛵ Ta usługa umożliwia kompatybilnym aplikacjom łatwe przeciwdziałanie ruchom małych urządzeń w interfejsie użytkownika.

🏝️ Może to poprawić czytelność ekranu i ewentualnie złagodzić chorobę lokomocyjną podczas podróży, np. podczas spaceru. podczas czytania w jadącym pojeździe.

⚡ Aplikacja została wykonana bardzo starannie, aby zminimalizować zużycie zasobów i zmaksymalizować wydajność.

Mamy nadzieję, że wam się spodoba 😊
aboutScreenTranslationsTitle Translations Tłumaczenia
aboutScreenTranslationsText Help translate this app and get a free license! More info: Pomóż przetłumaczyć tę aplikację i uzyskaj bezpłatną licencję! Więcej informacji:
aboutScreenLicenseTitle App license Licencja na aplikację
aboutScreenLicenseText This application is free and works without limitations. However, the parameters will return to their default values after 1 hour without a license. Ta aplikacja jest bezpłatna i działa bez ograniczeń. Jednak parametry powrócą do wartości domyślnych po 1 godzinie bez licencji.
aboutScreenGithubLink Stilly on GitHub Stilly na GitHubie
openSourceLicensesTitle Open source licenses Licencje open source
loremIpsum (This text is for demonstration purposes)

The soldier with the green whiskers led them through the streets of the Emerald City until they reached the room where the Guardian of the Gates lived. This officer unlocked their spectacles to put them back in his great box, and then he politely opened the gate for our friends.

"Which road leads to the Wicked Witch of the West?" asked Dorothy.

"There is no road," answered the Guardian of the Gates. "No one ever wishes to go that way."

"How, then, are we to find her?" inquired the girl.

"That will be easy," replied the man, "for when she knows you are in the country of the Winkies she will find you, and make you all her slaves."

"Perhaps not," said the Scarecrow, "for we mean to destroy her."

"Oh, that is different," said the Guardian of the Gates. "No one has ever destroyed her before, so I naturally thought she would make slaves of you, as she has of the rest. But take care; for she is wicked and fierce, and may not allow you to destroy her. Keep to the West, where the sun sets, and you cannot fail to find her."

They thanked him and bade him good-bye, and turned toward the West, walking over fields of soft grass dotted here and there with daisies and buttercups. Dorothy still wore the pretty silk dress she had put on in the palace, but now, to her surprise, she found it was no longer green, but pure white. The ribbon around Toto's neck had also lost its green color and was as white as Dorothy's dress.

The Emerald City was soon left far behind. As they advanced the ground became rougher and hillier, for there were no farms nor houses in this country of the West, and the ground was untilled.

In the afternoon the sun shone hot in their faces, for there were no trees to offer them shade; so that before night Dorothy and Toto and the Lion were tired, and lay down upon the grass and fell asleep, with the Woodman and the Scarecrow keeping watch.

Now the Wicked Witch of the West had but one eye, yet that was as powerful as a telescope, and could see everywhere. So, as she sat in the door of her castle, she happened to look around and saw Dorothy lying asleep, with her friends all about her. They were a long distance off, but the Wicked Witch was angry to find them in her country; so she blew upon a silver whistle that hung around her neck.

At once there came running to her from all directions a pack of great wolves. They had long legs and fierce eyes and sharp teeth.

"Go to those people," said the Witch, "and tear them to pieces."

"Are you not going to make them your slaves?" asked the leader of the wolves.

"No," she answered, "one is of tin, and one of straw; one is a girl and another a Lion. None of them is fit to work, so you may tear them into small pieces."

"Very well," said the wolf, and he dashed away at full speed, followed by the others.

It was lucky the Scarecrow and the Woodman were wide awake and heard the wolves coming.

"This is my fight," said the Woodman, "so get behind me and I will meet them as they come."

He seized his axe, which he had made very sharp, and as the leader of the wolves came on the Tin Woodman swung his arm and chopped the wolf's head from its body, so that it immediately died. As soon as he could raise his axe another wolf came up, and he also fell under the sharp edge of the Tin Woodman's weapon. There were forty wolves, and forty times a wolf was killed, so that at last they all lay dead in a heap before the Woodman.

Then he put down his axe and sat beside the Scarecrow, who said, "It was a good fight, friend."

They waited until Dorothy awoke the next morning. The little girl was quite frightened when she saw the great pile of shaggy wolves, but the Tin Woodman told her all. She thanked him for saving them and sat down to breakfast, after which they started again upon their journey.

Now this same morning the Wicked Witch came to the door of her castle and looked out with her one eye that could see far off. She saw all her wolves lying dead, and the strangers still traveling through her country. This made her angrier than before, and she blew her silver whistle twice.

Straightway a great flock of wild crows came flying toward her, enough to darken the sky.

And the Wicked Witch said to the King Crow, "Fly at once to the strangers; peck out their eyes and tear them to pieces."

The wild crows flew in one great flock toward Dorothy and her companions. When the little girl saw them coming she was afraid.

But the Scarecrow said, "This is my battle, so lie down beside me and you will not be harmed."

So they all lay upon the ground except the Scarecrow, and he stood up and stretched out his arms. And when the crows saw him they were frightened, as these birds always are by scarecrows, and did not dare to come any nearer. But the King Crow said:

"It is only a stuffed man. I will peck his eyes out."

The King Crow flew at the Scarecrow, who caught it by the head and twisted its neck until it died. And then another crow flew at him, and the Scarecrow twisted its neck also. There were forty crows, and forty times the Scarecrow twisted a neck, until at last all were lying dead beside him. Then he called to his companions to rise, and again they went upon their journey.

When the Wicked Witch looked out again and saw all her crows lying in a heap, she got into a terrible rage, and blew three times upon her silver whistle.

Forthwith there was heard a great buzzing in the air, and a swarm of black bees came flying toward her.

"Go to the strangers and sting them to death!" commanded the Witch, and the bees turned and flew rapidly until they came to where Dorothy and her friends were walking. But the Woodman had seen them coming, and the Scarecrow had decided what to do.

"Take out my straw and scatter it over the little girl and the dog and the Lion," he said to the Woodman, "and the bees cannot sting them." This the Woodman did, and as Dorothy lay close beside the Lion and held Toto in her arms, the straw covered them entirely.

The bees came and found no one but the Woodman to sting, so they flew at him and broke off all their stings against the tin, without hurting the Woodman at all. And as bees cannot live when their stings are broken that was the end of the black bees, and they lay scattered thick about the Woodman, like little heaps of fine coal.

Then Dorothy and the Lion got up, and the girl helped the Tin Woodman put the straw back into the Scarecrow again, until he was as good as ever. So they started upon their journey once more.

The Wicked Witch was so angry when she saw her black bees in little heaps like fine coal that she stamped her foot and tore her hair and gnashed her teeth. And then she called a dozen of her slaves, who were the Winkies, and gave them sharp spears, telling them to go to the strangers and destroy them.

The Winkies were not a brave people, but they had to do as they were told. So they marched away until they came near to Dorothy. Then the Lion gave a great roar and sprang towards them, and the poor Winkies were so frightened that they ran back as fast as they could.
(Ten tekst ma charakter demonstracyjny)

Żołnierz z zielonymi wąsami poprowadził ich ulicami Szmaragdowego Miasta, aż dotarli do pokoju, w którym mieszkał Strażnik Bram. Oficer ten zdjął im okulary, aby włożyć je z powrotem do swojego wielkiego pudełka, a następnie grzecznie otworzył bramę naszym przyjaciołom.

„Która droga prowadzi do Złej Czarownicy z Zachodu?” zapytała Dorota.

„Nie ma drogi” – odpowiedział Strażnik Bram. „Nikt nigdy nie chciałby iść tą drogą”.

– Jak w takim razie ją znajdziemy? zapytała dziewczyna.

„To będzie łatwe” – odpowiedział mężczyzna – „bo kiedy dowie się, że jesteś w krainie Winkie, znajdzie cię i uczyni wszystkich swoimi niewolnikami”.

„Być może nie” - powiedział Strach na Wróble - „ponieważ mamy zamiar ją zniszczyć”.

„Och, to co innego” – powiedział Strażnik Bram. „Nikt jej wcześniej nie zniszczył, więc naturalnie pomyślałem, że zrobi z ciebie niewolników, tak jak zrobiła to z resztą. Ale uważaj, bo jest niegodziwa i zacięta i może nie pozwolić ci ją zniszczyć. Trzymaj się Zachodzie, gdzie zachodzi słońce i nie możesz jej nie znaleźć.

Podziękowali mu i pożegnali się, po czym skierowali się na zachód, spacerując po polach miękkiej trawy, gdzieniegdzie usianych stokrotkami i jaskrami. Dorota nadal miała na sobie śliczną jedwabną sukienkę, którą założyła w pałacu, ale teraz, ku swemu zaskoczeniu, stwierdziła, że nie była już zielona, ale czysto biała. Wstążka wokół szyi Toto również straciła swój zielony kolor i była tak biała jak sukienka Doroty.

Wkrótce Szmaragdowe Miasto zostało daleko w tyle. W miarę jak posuwali się naprzód, ziemia stawała się coraz bardziej nierówna i pagórkowata, gdyż w tym zachodnim kraju nie było gospodarstw ani domów, a ziemia była uprawiana.

Po południu słońce paliło ich w twarze, bo nie było drzew, które zapewniałyby im cień; tak że przed nocą Dorota, Toto i Lew byli zmęczeni, położyli się na trawie i zasnęli, a Leśniczy i Strach na Wróble czuwali.

Teraz Zła Czarownica z Zachodu miała tylko jedno oko, a mimo to było potężne jak teleskop i widziało wszystko. Tak więc, gdy siedziała w drzwiach swojego zamku, przypadkiem rozejrzała się i zobaczyła śpiącą Dorotę wraz z przyjaciółmi wokół niej. Byli daleko od siebie, ale Zła Czarownica była wściekła, gdy znalazła ich w swoim kraju; więc dmuchnęła w srebrny gwizdek, który wisiał jej na szyi.

Natychmiast ze wszystkich stron nadbiegła do niej stado wielkich wilków. Mieli długie nogi, groźne oczy i ostre zęby.

„Idź do tych ludzi” – powiedziała Czarownica – „i rozerwij ich na kawałki”.

– Czy nie zamierzasz uczynić ich swoimi niewolnikami? zapytał przywódca wilków.

„Nie” – odpowiedziała, „jedno jest z blachy, drugie ze słomy, jedna jest dziewczynką, a druga lwem. Żadne z nich nie nadaje się do pracy, więc możesz je podrzeć na małe kawałki”.

„Dobrze” – powiedział wilk i pobiegł z pełną prędkością, a za nim pozostali.

Miał szczęście, że Strach na Wróble i Leśniczy nie spali i usłyszeli nadchodzące wilki.

„To moja walka” – powiedział Leśniczy – „więc stań za mną, a spotkam ich, gdy nadejdą”.

Chwycił swój topór, który zrobił bardzo ostry, a gdy przywódca wilków podszedł, Blaszany Drwal machnął ręką i odciął głowę wilka od ciała, tak że natychmiast umarł. Gdy tylko mógł podnieść topór, pojawił się kolejny wilk i on również wpadł pod ostrą krawędzią broni Blaszanego Drwala. Było czterdzieści wilków i czterdzieści razy zabito jednego wilka, tak że w końcu wszystkie leżały martwe na stosie przed Leśniczym.

Następnie odłożył topór i usiadł obok Stracha na Wróble, który powiedział: „To była dobra walka, przyjacielu”.

Czekali, aż Dorota obudzi się następnego ranka. Mała dziewczynka była bardzo przestraszona, kiedy zobaczyła wielką stertę kudłatych wilków, ale Blaszany Drwal powiedział jej wszystko. Podziękowała mu za uratowanie ich i zasiadła do śniadania, po czym wyruszyli w dalszą podróż.

Teraz tego samego ranka Zła Czarownica podeszła do drzwi swojego zamku i wyjrzała na zewnątrz swoim jednym okiem, które widziało daleko. Widziała wszystkie swoje wilki leżące martwe i obcych wciąż podróżujących po jej kraju. To rozzłościło ją jeszcze bardziej niż poprzednio i dwukrotnie zadąła w srebrny gwizdek.

Natychmiast nadleciało w jej stronę wielkie stado dzikich wron, wystarczające, by zaciemnić niebo.

I Zła Czarownica powiedziała do Króla Wrony: „Leć natychmiast do obcych, wydziobaj im oczy i rozerwij na strzępy”.

Dzikie wrony poleciały jednym wielkim stadem w stronę Doroty i jej towarzyszy. Kiedy mała dziewczynka zobaczyła, że nadchodzą, przestraszyła się.

Ale Strach na Wróble powiedział: „To moja bitwa, więc połóż się obok mnie, a nic ci się nie stanie”.

Więc wszyscy leżeli na ziemi z wyjątkiem Stracha na Wróble, a on wstał i wyciągnął ramiona. A kiedy wrony go ujrzały, przestraszyły się, jak to ptaki zawsze atakują strachy na wróble, i nie odważyły się podejść bliżej. Ale Król Wrona powiedział:

„To tylko wypchany człowiek. Wydłubię mu oczy”.

Król Wrona poleciał na Stracha na Wróble, który złapał go za głowę i wykręcił mu szyję, aż umarł. A potem poleciała na niego kolejna wrona, a Strach na Wróble również skręcił szyję. Było czterdzieści wron i czterdzieści razy Strach na Wróble skręcił kark, aż w końcu wszystkie leżały martwe obok niego. Następnie zawołał swoich towarzyszy, aby wstali, i ponownie wyruszyli w podróż.

Kiedy Zła Czarownica wyjrzała ponownie i zobaczyła wszystkie swoje wrony leżące w kupie, wpadła w straszliwą wściekłość i trzykrotnie zadąła w swój srebrny gwizdek.

Natychmiast rozległo się wielkie brzęczenie w powietrzu i rój czarnych pszczół poleciał w jej stronę.

„Idź do obcych i użądl ich na śmierć!” - rozkazała Czarownica, a pszczoły odwróciły się i szybko poleciały, aż dotarły do miejsca, gdzie szła Dorota z przyjaciółmi. Ale Leśniczy widział, jak nadchodzą, i Strach na Wróble zdecydował, co zrobić.

„Wyjmij moją słomkę i rzuć ją na dziewczynkę, psa i Lwa” – powiedział do Leśniczego – „a pszczoły nie będą mogły ich użądlić”. Leśniczy to zrobił, a gdy Dorota leżała blisko Lwa i trzymała Toto w ramionach, słoma całkowicie ich zakryła.

Pszczoły przyleciały i nie znalazły nikogo innego, jak tylko Leśniczy, które mogłyby użądlić, więc poleciały na niego i odłamały wszystkie swoje żądła o puszkę, nie robiąc mu wcale krzywdy. A ponieważ pszczoły nie mogą żyć, gdy ich żądła zostaną połamane, taki był koniec czarnych pszczół i leżały gęsto wokół Leśniczego, jak małe kupki miału węglowego.

Potem Dorota i Lew wstali, a dziewczyna pomogła Blaszanemu Drwalowi ponownie włożyć słomkę do Stracha na Wróble, aż poczuł się jak dawniej. Wyruszyli więc w podróż jeszcze raz.

Zła Czarownica była tak wściekła, kiedy zobaczyła swoje czarne pszczoły w małych kupkach przypominających miał węgiel, że tupnęła nogą, wyrywała sobie włosy i zgrzytała zębami. A potem przywołała tuzin swoich niewolników, którymi byli Winkie, i dała im ostre włócznie, mówiąc im, aby udali się do nieznajomych i ich zniszczyli.

Winkie nie były odważnym ludem, ale musiały robić, co im kazano. I tak maszerowali, aż zbliżyli się do Doroty. Wtedy Lew wydał z siebie wielki ryk i rzucił się w ich stronę, a biedne Winkie tak się przestraszyły, że uciekły tak szybko, jak tylko mogły.
dialogConsentTitle Consent Zgoda
dialogConsentMessage This application needs the AccessibilityService API to retrieve interactive windows on the screen, in order to find compatible ones.

The service then sends multiple "move window" accessibility actions to such windows, as needed, to perform the intended function.
Ta aplikacja potrzebuje interfejsu API AccessibilityService do pobierania interaktywnych okien na ekranie i znajdowania kompatybilnych.

Następnie usługa wysyła do takich okien wiele akcji ułatwień dostępu „przenieś okno”, jeśli jest to konieczne, aby wykonać zamierzoną funkcję.
dialogConsentButton Accept Zaakceptować
dialogInfoTitle @string/menuInfo
dialogInfoMessage Shake the device a little. Notice how the background content softens these movements, making on-screen reading easier. (Stilly service must be enabled in the Accessibility settings for this to happen.)

This functionality can be easily implemented in any application. Please follow the instructions on GitHub.
Wstrząśnij trochę urządzeniem. Zwróć uwagę, jak zawartość tła łagodzi te ruchy, ułatwiając czytanie na ekranie. (Aby tak się stało, usługa Stillly musi być włączona w ustawieniach dostępności.)

Funkcjonalność tę można łatwo zaimplementować w dowolnej aplikacji. Postępuj zgodnie z instrukcjami na GitHubie.
dialogInfoButton Go to GitHub Przejdź do GitHuba
dialogRestoreDefaultsTitle @string/menuRestoreDefaults
dialogRestoreDefaultsMessage Restore settings to default values? Przywrócić ustawienia do wartości domyślnych?
serviceInactiveText Service is disabled, click here to enable. Usługa jest wyłączona. Kliknij tutaj, aby ją włączyć.
menuTheme Theme Temat
menuIncreaseTextSize Increase text size Zwiększ rozmiar tekstu
menuDecreaseTextSize Decrease text size Zmniejsz rozmiar tekstu
menuInfo Info Informacje
menuSettings Accessibility settings Ustawienia dostępności
menuRestoreDefaults Restore defaults Przywróć domyślne
Key English Polish
dialogButtonRateOnPlayStore Rate on Play Store Oceń w Sklepie Play
dialogConsentButton Accept Zaakceptować
dialogConsentMessage This application needs the AccessibilityService API to retrieve interactive windows on the screen, in order to find compatible ones.

The service then sends multiple "move window" accessibility actions to such windows, as needed, to perform the intended function.
Ta aplikacja potrzebuje interfejsu API AccessibilityService do pobierania interaktywnych okien na ekranie i znajdowania kompatybilnych.

Następnie usługa wysyła do takich okien wiele akcji ułatwień dostępu „przenieś okno”, jeśli jest to konieczne, aby wykonać zamierzoną funkcję.
dialogConsentTitle Consent Zgoda
dialogInfoButton Go to GitHub Przejdź do GitHuba
dialogInfoMessage Shake the device a little. Notice how the background content softens these movements, making on-screen reading easier. (Stilly service must be enabled in the Accessibility settings for this to happen.)

This functionality can be easily implemented in any application. Please follow the instructions on GitHub.
Wstrząśnij trochę urządzeniem. Zwróć uwagę, jak zawartość tła łagodzi te ruchy, ułatwiając czytanie na ekranie. (Aby tak się stało, usługa Stillly musi być włączona w ustawieniach dostępności.)

Funkcjonalność tę można łatwo zaimplementować w dowolnej aplikacji. Postępuj zgodnie z instrukcjami na GitHubie.
dialogInfoTitle @string/menuInfo
dialogRestoreDefaultsMessage Restore settings to default values? Przywrócić ustawienia do wartości domyślnych?
dialogRestoreDefaultsTitle @string/menuRestoreDefaults
dialogReviewNudgeMessage Are you enjoying this app? Czy podoba Ci się ta aplikacja?
dialogReviewNudgeMessage2 Thanks! Please write a nice review or rate us 5 stars on the Play Store. Dzięki! Napisz miłą recenzję lub oceń nas 5 gwiazdkami w Sklepie Play.
generalError Some error occurred. Please try again. Wystąpił jakiś błąd. Proszę spróbuj ponownie.
licenseItemAlreadyOwned License item already owned Przedmiot licencji już posiadany
licenseSuccessDialogMessage The app was licensed successfully. Thank you for your support! Aplikacja została pomyślnie licencjonowana. Dziękuję za Twoje wsparcie!
licenseSuccessDialogTitle @string/app_name
loremIpsum (This text is for demonstration purposes)

The soldier with the green whiskers led them through the streets of the Emerald City until they reached the room where the Guardian of the Gates lived. This officer unlocked their spectacles to put them back in his great box, and then he politely opened the gate for our friends.

"Which road leads to the Wicked Witch of the West?" asked Dorothy.

"There is no road," answered the Guardian of the Gates. "No one ever wishes to go that way."

"How, then, are we to find her?" inquired the girl.

"That will be easy," replied the man, "for when she knows you are in the country of the Winkies she will find you, and make you all her slaves."

"Perhaps not," said the Scarecrow, "for we mean to destroy her."

"Oh, that is different," said the Guardian of the Gates. "No one has ever destroyed her before, so I naturally thought she would make slaves of you, as she has of the rest. But take care; for she is wicked and fierce, and may not allow you to destroy her. Keep to the West, where the sun sets, and you cannot fail to find her."

They thanked him and bade him good-bye, and turned toward the West, walking over fields of soft grass dotted here and there with daisies and buttercups. Dorothy still wore the pretty silk dress she had put on in the palace, but now, to her surprise, she found it was no longer green, but pure white. The ribbon around Toto's neck had also lost its green color and was as white as Dorothy's dress.

The Emerald City was soon left far behind. As they advanced the ground became rougher and hillier, for there were no farms nor houses in this country of the West, and the ground was untilled.

In the afternoon the sun shone hot in their faces, for there were no trees to offer them shade; so that before night Dorothy and Toto and the Lion were tired, and lay down upon the grass and fell asleep, with the Woodman and the Scarecrow keeping watch.

Now the Wicked Witch of the West had but one eye, yet that was as powerful as a telescope, and could see everywhere. So, as she sat in the door of her castle, she happened to look around and saw Dorothy lying asleep, with her friends all about her. They were a long distance off, but the Wicked Witch was angry to find them in her country; so she blew upon a silver whistle that hung around her neck.

At once there came running to her from all directions a pack of great wolves. They had long legs and fierce eyes and sharp teeth.

"Go to those people," said the Witch, "and tear them to pieces."

"Are you not going to make them your slaves?" asked the leader of the wolves.

"No," she answered, "one is of tin, and one of straw; one is a girl and another a Lion. None of them is fit to work, so you may tear them into small pieces."

"Very well," said the wolf, and he dashed away at full speed, followed by the others.

It was lucky the Scarecrow and the Woodman were wide awake and heard the wolves coming.

"This is my fight," said the Woodman, "so get behind me and I will meet them as they come."

He seized his axe, which he had made very sharp, and as the leader of the wolves came on the Tin Woodman swung his arm and chopped the wolf's head from its body, so that it immediately died. As soon as he could raise his axe another wolf came up, and he also fell under the sharp edge of the Tin Woodman's weapon. There were forty wolves, and forty times a wolf was killed, so that at last they all lay dead in a heap before the Woodman.

Then he put down his axe and sat beside the Scarecrow, who said, "It was a good fight, friend."

They waited until Dorothy awoke the next morning. The little girl was quite frightened when she saw the great pile of shaggy wolves, but the Tin Woodman told her all. She thanked him for saving them and sat down to breakfast, after which they started again upon their journey.

Now this same morning the Wicked Witch came to the door of her castle and looked out with her one eye that could see far off. She saw all her wolves lying dead, and the strangers still traveling through her country. This made her angrier than before, and she blew her silver whistle twice.

Straightway a great flock of wild crows came flying toward her, enough to darken the sky.

And the Wicked Witch said to the King Crow, "Fly at once to the strangers; peck out their eyes and tear them to pieces."

The wild crows flew in one great flock toward Dorothy and her companions. When the little girl saw them coming she was afraid.

But the Scarecrow said, "This is my battle, so lie down beside me and you will not be harmed."

So they all lay upon the ground except the Scarecrow, and he stood up and stretched out his arms. And when the crows saw him they were frightened, as these birds always are by scarecrows, and did not dare to come any nearer. But the King Crow said:

"It is only a stuffed man. I will peck his eyes out."

The King Crow flew at the Scarecrow, who caught it by the head and twisted its neck until it died. And then another crow flew at him, and the Scarecrow twisted its neck also. There were forty crows, and forty times the Scarecrow twisted a neck, until at last all were lying dead beside him. Then he called to his companions to rise, and again they went upon their journey.

When the Wicked Witch looked out again and saw all her crows lying in a heap, she got into a terrible rage, and blew three times upon her silver whistle.

Forthwith there was heard a great buzzing in the air, and a swarm of black bees came flying toward her.

"Go to the strangers and sting them to death!" commanded the Witch, and the bees turned and flew rapidly until they came to where Dorothy and her friends were walking. But the Woodman had seen them coming, and the Scarecrow had decided what to do.

"Take out my straw and scatter it over the little girl and the dog and the Lion," he said to the Woodman, "and the bees cannot sting them." This the Woodman did, and as Dorothy lay close beside the Lion and held Toto in her arms, the straw covered them entirely.

The bees came and found no one but the Woodman to sting, so they flew at him and broke off all their stings against the tin, without hurting the Woodman at all. And as bees cannot live when their stings are broken that was the end of the black bees, and they lay scattered thick about the Woodman, like little heaps of fine coal.

Then Dorothy and the Lion got up, and the girl helped the Tin Woodman put the straw back into the Scarecrow again, until he was as good as ever. So they started upon their journey once more.

The Wicked Witch was so angry when she saw her black bees in little heaps like fine coal that she stamped her foot and tore her hair and gnashed her teeth. And then she called a dozen of her slaves, who were the Winkies, and gave them sharp spears, telling them to go to the strangers and destroy them.

The Winkies were not a brave people, but they had to do as they were told. So they marched away until they came near to Dorothy. Then the Lion gave a great roar and sprang towards them, and the poor Winkies were so frightened that they ran back as fast as they could.
(Ten tekst ma charakter demonstracyjny)

Żołnierz z zielonymi wąsami poprowadził ich ulicami Szmaragdowego Miasta, aż dotarli do pokoju, w którym mieszkał Strażnik Bram. Oficer ten zdjął im okulary, aby włożyć je z powrotem do swojego wielkiego pudełka, a następnie grzecznie otworzył bramę naszym przyjaciołom.

„Która droga prowadzi do Złej Czarownicy z Zachodu?” zapytała Dorota.

„Nie ma drogi” – odpowiedział Strażnik Bram. „Nikt nigdy nie chciałby iść tą drogą”.

– Jak w takim razie ją znajdziemy? zapytała dziewczyna.

„To będzie łatwe” – odpowiedział mężczyzna – „bo kiedy dowie się, że jesteś w krainie Winkie, znajdzie cię i uczyni wszystkich swoimi niewolnikami”.

„Być może nie” - powiedział Strach na Wróble - „ponieważ mamy zamiar ją zniszczyć”.

„Och, to co innego” – powiedział Strażnik Bram. „Nikt jej wcześniej nie zniszczył, więc naturalnie pomyślałem, że zrobi z ciebie niewolników, tak jak zrobiła to z resztą. Ale uważaj, bo jest niegodziwa i zacięta i może nie pozwolić ci ją zniszczyć. Trzymaj się Zachodzie, gdzie zachodzi słońce i nie możesz jej nie znaleźć.

Podziękowali mu i pożegnali się, po czym skierowali się na zachód, spacerując po polach miękkiej trawy, gdzieniegdzie usianych stokrotkami i jaskrami. Dorota nadal miała na sobie śliczną jedwabną sukienkę, którą założyła w pałacu, ale teraz, ku swemu zaskoczeniu, stwierdziła, że nie była już zielona, ale czysto biała. Wstążka wokół szyi Toto również straciła swój zielony kolor i była tak biała jak sukienka Doroty.

Wkrótce Szmaragdowe Miasto zostało daleko w tyle. W miarę jak posuwali się naprzód, ziemia stawała się coraz bardziej nierówna i pagórkowata, gdyż w tym zachodnim kraju nie było gospodarstw ani domów, a ziemia była uprawiana.

Po południu słońce paliło ich w twarze, bo nie było drzew, które zapewniałyby im cień; tak że przed nocą Dorota, Toto i Lew byli zmęczeni, położyli się na trawie i zasnęli, a Leśniczy i Strach na Wróble czuwali.

Teraz Zła Czarownica z Zachodu miała tylko jedno oko, a mimo to było potężne jak teleskop i widziało wszystko. Tak więc, gdy siedziała w drzwiach swojego zamku, przypadkiem rozejrzała się i zobaczyła śpiącą Dorotę wraz z przyjaciółmi wokół niej. Byli daleko od siebie, ale Zła Czarownica była wściekła, gdy znalazła ich w swoim kraju; więc dmuchnęła w srebrny gwizdek, który wisiał jej na szyi.

Natychmiast ze wszystkich stron nadbiegła do niej stado wielkich wilków. Mieli długie nogi, groźne oczy i ostre zęby.

„Idź do tych ludzi” – powiedziała Czarownica – „i rozerwij ich na kawałki”.

– Czy nie zamierzasz uczynić ich swoimi niewolnikami? zapytał przywódca wilków.

„Nie” – odpowiedziała, „jedno jest z blachy, drugie ze słomy, jedna jest dziewczynką, a druga lwem. Żadne z nich nie nadaje się do pracy, więc możesz je podrzeć na małe kawałki”.

„Dobrze” – powiedział wilk i pobiegł z pełną prędkością, a za nim pozostali.

Miał szczęście, że Strach na Wróble i Leśniczy nie spali i usłyszeli nadchodzące wilki.

„To moja walka” – powiedział Leśniczy – „więc stań za mną, a spotkam ich, gdy nadejdą”.

Chwycił swój topór, który zrobił bardzo ostry, a gdy przywódca wilków podszedł, Blaszany Drwal machnął ręką i odciął głowę wilka od ciała, tak że natychmiast umarł. Gdy tylko mógł podnieść topór, pojawił się kolejny wilk i on również wpadł pod ostrą krawędzią broni Blaszanego Drwala. Było czterdzieści wilków i czterdzieści razy zabito jednego wilka, tak że w końcu wszystkie leżały martwe na stosie przed Leśniczym.

Następnie odłożył topór i usiadł obok Stracha na Wróble, który powiedział: „To była dobra walka, przyjacielu”.

Czekali, aż Dorota obudzi się następnego ranka. Mała dziewczynka była bardzo przestraszona, kiedy zobaczyła wielką stertę kudłatych wilków, ale Blaszany Drwal powiedział jej wszystko. Podziękowała mu za uratowanie ich i zasiadła do śniadania, po czym wyruszyli w dalszą podróż.

Teraz tego samego ranka Zła Czarownica podeszła do drzwi swojego zamku i wyjrzała na zewnątrz swoim jednym okiem, które widziało daleko. Widziała wszystkie swoje wilki leżące martwe i obcych wciąż podróżujących po jej kraju. To rozzłościło ją jeszcze bardziej niż poprzednio i dwukrotnie zadąła w srebrny gwizdek.

Natychmiast nadleciało w jej stronę wielkie stado dzikich wron, wystarczające, by zaciemnić niebo.

I Zła Czarownica powiedziała do Króla Wrony: „Leć natychmiast do obcych, wydziobaj im oczy i rozerwij na strzępy”.

Dzikie wrony poleciały jednym wielkim stadem w stronę Doroty i jej towarzyszy. Kiedy mała dziewczynka zobaczyła, że nadchodzą, przestraszyła się.

Ale Strach na Wróble powiedział: „To moja bitwa, więc połóż się obok mnie, a nic ci się nie stanie”.

Więc wszyscy leżeli na ziemi z wyjątkiem Stracha na Wróble, a on wstał i wyciągnął ramiona. A kiedy wrony go ujrzały, przestraszyły się, jak to ptaki zawsze atakują strachy na wróble, i nie odważyły się podejść bliżej. Ale Król Wrona powiedział:

„To tylko wypchany człowiek. Wydłubię mu oczy”.

Król Wrona poleciał na Stracha na Wróble, który złapał go za głowę i wykręcił mu szyję, aż umarł. A potem poleciała na niego kolejna wrona, a Strach na Wróble również skręcił szyję. Było czterdzieści wron i czterdzieści razy Strach na Wróble skręcił kark, aż w końcu wszystkie leżały martwe obok niego. Następnie zawołał swoich towarzyszy, aby wstali, i ponownie wyruszyli w podróż.

Kiedy Zła Czarownica wyjrzała ponownie i zobaczyła wszystkie swoje wrony leżące w kupie, wpadła w straszliwą wściekłość i trzykrotnie zadąła w swój srebrny gwizdek.

Natychmiast rozległo się wielkie brzęczenie w powietrzu i rój czarnych pszczół poleciał w jej stronę.

„Idź do obcych i użądl ich na śmierć!” - rozkazała Czarownica, a pszczoły odwróciły się i szybko poleciały, aż dotarły do miejsca, gdzie szła Dorota z przyjaciółmi. Ale Leśniczy widział, jak nadchodzą, i Strach na Wróble zdecydował, co zrobić.

„Wyjmij moją słomkę i rzuć ją na dziewczynkę, psa i Lwa” – powiedział do Leśniczego – „a pszczoły nie będą mogły ich użądlić”. Leśniczy to zrobił, a gdy Dorota leżała blisko Lwa i trzymała Toto w ramionach, słoma całkowicie ich zakryła.

Pszczoły przyleciały i nie znalazły nikogo innego, jak tylko Leśniczy, które mogłyby użądlić, więc poleciały na niego i odłamały wszystkie swoje żądła o puszkę, nie robiąc mu wcale krzywdy. A ponieważ pszczoły nie mogą żyć, gdy ich żądła zostaną połamane, taki był koniec czarnych pszczół i leżały gęsto wokół Leśniczego, jak małe kupki miału węglowego.

Potem Dorota i Lew wstali, a dziewczyna pomogła Blaszanemu Drwalowi ponownie włożyć słomkę do Stracha na Wróble, aż poczuł się jak dawniej. Wyruszyli więc w podróż jeszcze raz.

Zła Czarownica była tak wściekła, kiedy zobaczyła swoje czarne pszczoły w małych kupkach przypominających miał węgiel, że tupnęła nogą, wyrywała sobie włosy i zgrzytała zębami. A potem przywołała tuzin swoich niewolników, którymi byli Winkie, i dała im ostre włócznie, mówiąc im, aby udali się do nieznajomych i ich zniszczyli.

Winkie nie były odważnym ludem, ale musiały robić, co im kazano. I tak maszerowali, aż zbliżyli się do Doroty. Wtedy Lew wydał z siebie wielki ryk i rzucił się w ich stronę, a biedne Winkie tak się przestraszyły, że uciekły tak szybko, jak tylko mogły.
measuredSensorRate Measured sensor rate Zmierzona częstotliwość czujnika
measuredSensorRateInfo Current sensor rate as measured by the app. This may differ from the desired sensor rate as the system ultimately decides which rate to provide. Aktualna częstotliwość czujnika zmierzona przez aplikację. Może się ona różnić od żądanej szybkości czujnika, ponieważ system ostatecznie decyduje, jaką szybkość zapewnić.
menuAbout About O
menuDecreaseTextSize Decrease text size Zmniejsz rozmiar tekstu
menuIncreaseTextSize Increase text size Zwiększ rozmiar tekstu
menuInfo Info Informacje
menuLicense Upgrade your license Uaktualnij swoją licencję
menuRateAndComment Rate us Oceń nas
menuRestoreDefaults Restore defaults Przywróć domyślne
menuSendDebugFeedback Report an issue Zgłoś problem
menuSettings Accessibility settings Ustawienia dostępności
menuTheme Theme Temat
no No NIE
ok OK OK

Loading…

User avatar None

Automatic translation

Stilly / StringsPolish

3 months ago
Browse all component changes

Things to check

Has been translated

Previous translation was "(Ten tekst ma charakter demonstracyjny) Żołnierz z zielonymi wąsami poprowadził ich ulicami Szmaragdowego Miasta, aż dotarli do pokoju, w którym mieszkał Strażnik Bram. Oficer ten zdjął im okulary, aby włożyć je z powrotem do swojego wielkiego pudełka, a następnie grzecznie otworzył bramę naszym przyjaciołom. „Która droga prowadzi do Złej Czarownicy z Zachodu?” zapytała Dorota. „Nie ma drogi” – odpowiedział Strażnik Bram. „Nikt nigdy nie chciałby iść tą drogą”. – Jak w takim razie ją znajdziemy? zapytała dziewczyna. „To będzie łatwe” – odpowiedział mężczyzna – „bo kiedy dowie się, że jesteś w krainie Winkie, znajdzie cię i uczyni wszystkich swoimi niewolnikami”. „Być może nie” - powiedział Strach na Wróble - „ponieważ mamy zamiar ją zniszczyć”. „Och, to co innego” – powiedział Strażnik Bram. „Nikt jej wcześniej nie zniszczył, więc naturalnie pomyślałem, że zrobi z ciebie niewolników, tak jak zrobiła to z resztą. Ale uważaj, bo jest niegodziwa i zacięta i może nie pozwolić ci ją zniszczyć. Trzymaj się Zachodzie, gdzie zachodzi słońce i nie możesz jej nie znaleźć. Podziękowali mu i pożegnali się, po czym skierowali się na zachód, spacerując po polach miękkiej trawy, gdzieniegdzie usianych stokrotkami i jaskrami. Dorota nadal miała na sobie śliczną jedwabną sukienkę, którą założyła w pałacu, ale teraz, ku swemu zaskoczeniu, stwierdziła, że nie była już zielona, ale czysto biała. Wstążka wokół szyi Toto również straciła swój zielony kolor i była tak biała jak sukienka Doroty. Wkrótce Szmaragdowe Miasto zostało daleko w tyle. W miarę jak posuwali się naprzód, ziemia stawała się coraz bardziej nierówna i pagórkowata, gdyż w tym zachodnim kraju nie było gospodarstw ani domów, a ziemia była uprawiana. Po południu słońce paliło ich w twarze, bo nie było drzew, które zapewniałyby im cień; tak że przed nocą Dorota, Toto i Lew byli zmęczeni, położyli się na trawie i zasnęli, a Leśniczy i Strach na Wróble czuwali. Teraz Zła Czarownica z Zachodu miała tylko jedno oko, a mimo to było potężne jak teleskop i widziało wszystko. Tak więc, gdy siedziała w drzwiach swojego zamku, przypadkiem rozejrzała się i zobaczyła śpiącą Dorotę wraz z przyjaciółmi wokół niej. Byli daleko od siebie, ale Zła Czarownica była wściekła, gdy znalazła ich w swoim kraju; więc dmuchnęła w srebrny gwizdek, który wisiał jej na szyi. Natychmiast ze wszystkich stron nadbiegła do niej stado wielkich wilków. Mieli długie nogi, groźne oczy i ostre zęby. „Idź do tych ludzi” – powiedziała Czarownica – „i rozerwij ich na kawałki”. – Czy nie zamierzasz uczynić ich swoimi niewolnikami? zapytał przywódca wilków. „Nie” – odpowiedziała, „jedno jest z blachy, drugie ze słomy, jedna jest dziewczynką, a druga lwem. Żadne z nich nie nadaje się do pracy, więc możesz je podrzeć na małe kawałki”. „Dobrze” – powiedział wilk i pobiegł z pełną prędkością, a za nim pozostali. Miał szczęście, że Strach na Wróble i Leśniczy nie spali i usłyszeli nadchodzące wilki. „To moja walka” – powiedział Leśniczy – „więc stań za mną, a spotkam ich, gdy nadejdą”. Chwycił swój topór, który zrobił bardzo ostry, a gdy przywódca wilków podszedł, Blaszany Drwal machnął ręką i odciął głowę wilka od ciała, tak że natychmiast umarł. Gdy tylko mógł podnieść topór, pojawił się kolejny wilk i on również wpadł pod ostrą krawędzią broni Blaszanego Drwala. Było czterdzieści wilków i czterdzieści razy zabito jednego wilka, tak że w końcu wszystkie leżały martwe na stosie przed Leśniczym. Następnie odłożył topór i usiadł obok Stracha na Wróble, który powiedział: „To była dobra walka, przyjacielu”. Czekali, aż Dorota obudzi się następnego ranka. Mała dziewczynka była bardzo przestraszona, kiedy zobaczyła wielką stertę kudłatych wilków, ale Blaszany Drwal powiedział jej wszystko. Podziękowała mu za uratowanie ich i zasiadła do śniadania, po czym wyruszyli w dalszą podróż. Teraz tego samego ranka Zła Czarownica podeszła do drzwi swojego zamku i wyjrzała na zewnątrz swoim jednym okiem, które widziało daleko. Widziała wszystkie swoje wilki leżące martwe i obcych wciąż podróżujących po jej kraju. To rozzłościło ją jeszcze bardziej niż poprzednio i dwukrotnie zadąła w srebrny gwizdek. Natychmiast nadleciało w jej stronę wielkie stado dzikich wron, wystarczające, by zaciemnić niebo. I Zła Czarownica powiedziała do Króla Wrony: „Leć natychmiast do obcych, wydziobaj im oczy i rozerwij na strzępy”. Dzikie wrony poleciały jednym wielkim stadem w stronę Doroty i jej towarzyszy. Kiedy mała dziewczynka zobaczyła, że nadchodzą, przestraszyła się. Ale Strach na Wróble powiedział: „To moja bitwa, więc połóż się obok mnie, a nic ci się nie stanie”. Więc wszyscy leżeli na ziemi z wyjątkiem Stracha na Wróble, a on wstał i wyciągnął ramiona. A kiedy wrony go ujrzały, przestraszyły się, jak to ptaki zawsze atakują strachy na wróble, i nie odważyły się podejść bliżej. Ale Król Wrona powiedział: „To tylko wypchany człowiek. Wydłubię mu oczy”. Król Wrona poleciał na Stracha na Wróble, który złapał go za głowę i wykręcił mu szyję, aż umarł. A potem poleciała na niego kolejna wrona, a Strach na Wróble również skręcił szyję. Było czterdzieści wron i czterdzieści razy Strach na Wróble skręcił kark, aż w końcu wszystkie leżały martwe obok niego. Następnie zawołał swoich towarzyszy, aby wstali, i ponownie wyruszyli w podróż. Kiedy Zła Czarownica wyjrzała ponownie i zobaczyła wszystkie swoje wrony leżące w kupie, wpadła w straszliwą wściekłość i trzykrotnie zadąła w swój srebrny gwizdek. Natychmiast rozległo się wielkie brzęczenie w powietrzu i rój czarnych pszczół poleciał w jej stronę. „Idź do obcych i użądl ich na śmierć!” - rozkazała Czarownica, a pszczoły odwróciły się i szybko poleciały, aż dotarły do miejsca, gdzie szła Dorota z przyjaciółmi. Ale Leśniczy widział, jak nadchodzą, i Strach na Wróble zdecydował, co zrobić. „Wyjmij moją słomkę i rzuć ją na dziewczynkę, psa i Lwa” – powiedział do Leśniczego – „a pszczoły nie będą mogły ich użądlić”. Leśniczy to zrobił, a gdy Dorota leżała blisko Lwa i trzymała Toto w ramionach, słoma całkowicie ich zakryła. Pszczoły przyleciały i nie znalazły nikogo innego, jak tylko Leśniczy, które mogłyby użądlić, więc poleciały na niego i odłamały wszystkie swoje żądła o puszkę, nie robiąc mu wcale krzywdy. A ponieważ pszczoły nie mogą żyć, gdy ich żądła zostaną połamane, taki był koniec czarnych pszczół i leżały gęsto wokół Leśniczego, jak małe kupki miału węglowego. Potem Dorota i Lew wstali, a dziewczyna pomogła Blaszanemu Drwalowi ponownie włożyć słomkę do Stracha na Wróble, aż poczuł się jak dawniej. Wyruszyli więc w podróż jeszcze raz. Zła Czarownica była tak wściekła, kiedy zobaczyła swoje czarne pszczoły w małych kupkach przypominających miał węgiel, że tupnęła nogą, wyrywała sobie włosy i zgrzytała zębami. A potem przywołała tuzin swoich niewolników, którymi byli Winkie, i dała im ostre włócznie, mówiąc im, aby udali się do nieznajomych i ich zniszczyli. Winkie nie były odważnym ludem, ale musiały robić, co im kazano. I tak maszerowali, aż zbliżyli się do Doroty. Wtedy Lew wydał z siebie wielki ryk i rzucił się w ich stronę, a biedne Winkie tak się przestraszyły, że uciekły tak szybko, jak tylko mogły.".

Fix string

Reset

Glossary

English Polish
No related strings found in the glossary.

String information

Key
loremIpsum
Flags
java-format
String age
3 months ago
Source string age
3 months ago
Translation file
translate/strings-pl.xml, string 9